Monday, 25 March 2013

The yoghurts of Paris

There are many, many delicious delights that await the visitor to Paris. Most are well documented. Pastries. Macarons. Chocolates. Icecreams. They're always great of course, and I will sample all of these again- and more. But when I'm in Paris I look to the more ordinary daily pleasure like yoghurt too.

The flavours may be novel.

Prune!

Lime!

Chestnut!

More chestnut...

The ingredients may be novel.


Raspberry goat yoghurt


The texture is different to what we have in Australia.

I now realise that this is Fontainebleau, a light as air cheese,
and not a yoghurt as such

You can buy yoghurt in lots of places. The more expected places.

like the supermarket
or the local street market
But also when you're out and about too.

Lunching at Parc de la Villette (vanilla)

or when grabbing a quick lunch from a cafe (lemon)

Some of the containers are plastic, but many are of reusable materials- glass, ceramic- especially when you're out and about. I'm always a bit conflicted then. What should I do with the container? Carry it around in my bag? Leave it at the cafe and hope that they recycle it? Those little glass jars are so cute. But it's not really feasible to bring them home to Australia. Our apartment didn't have an obvious recycling bin, and it took me a while to identify the public recycling facilities provided by the city. But they do exist if you look- large green bins often on street corners from memory.



Dreaming of France, a great Monday meme from Paulita at An Accidental Blog

13 comments:

Hannah said...

Chestnut! *whimper*

Marg said...

What? No Yoplait? Isn't that French for yoghurt?

The texture looks completely different to what we are used to here!

vicki (skiourophile) said...

So pleased that someone else takes lots of photos of dairy cabinets in supermarkets! I have a bit of a must-photograph-all-varieties-of-French-butter fetish, though I do confess to admiring the yoghurts a lot too.

Paulita said...

It's so fun to realize the daily differences in cultures. Yogurt is definitely one of them. When my daughter Grace was over there, she got addicted to pear yogurt. We couldn't find it here for the longest time, but lately the Greek yogurts are offering pear flavor. I've never tried chestnut yogurt. Thanks for playing along. Here’s my Dreaming of France meme

Louise said...

Hannah is there not chestnut deliciousness in Canada? I remember trying roasted chestnuts there (and not liking them, but still they were there).

Ah very good Marg! I will have to check, I don't think I remember any yoplait. And the texture is very different.

Vicki, I sometimes wonder at what people think about taking pictures of supermarket dairy cases, but am happily old enough that I don't really care... I'm planning a more proper assault on the butter on my next trip.

Paulita- pear yoghurt! Wow. I have to try that, I hope it's still there. Chestnut yoghurt is delicious, you should definitely try it if you find it sometime.

Sim Carter said...

The vanilla yogurt - yoghurt - in one of your pictures is from Yoplait. I recognized it because the picture of the vanilla is exactly the same as I have sitting in my fridge right now but the yogurt itself looks different and the packaging is plastic.
What a fun little post ! Have a good week Louise!

Allison said...

Ah, if only the countries could swap samples. I'd love to taste some Parisian yogurt.

wordsandpeace.com said...

OMG, I had forgotten making my own yogourt à la crème de marron! I just bought regular plain yogurt, and separate chesnut jam, and would mix them as I wanted.

Marg said...

Vicki, I was very disappointed when I realised that Yoplait wasn't French for anything and that it really was just a very clever marketing campaign.

Susan said...

Yum! Even yogurt looks better in Paris.

Swan Pond said...

I brought the ceramic pot home to oz, but not sure what I would do if i had a dozen. The amount of supermarket shelves devoted to yoghurt in France is unbelievable, n'est ce pas?

Esme said...

I am going to have to be more adventurous with the yogurts next time
I am in France. I always eat so much pastry I am hesitant to junk out on the yogurts.

Parisbreakfasts said...

I love using those glass containers as watercolor water jars...I've brought them back to the US..now I don't have to ;) I've never noticed the mini jam jars with lids - a new thing to covet. I don't usually try many flavors then I broke down and tasted Mamie's creme d'amande!
Forever tempted now. I do think anything vanilla is far superior to what we get int he states.